Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Happy Birthday, Leaplings!

TWUniversal Search (accessible from the TWU Libraries homepage, at the bottom of the maroon column on the left) is a useful tool for all types of research--scholarly, popular and the just-for-fun.

As a Leap Day demonstration, a search for 'leap year' in TWUniversal Search yields sources containing the following 'leap' info that will make you the most popular person at your Leap Day gathering:

LEAPLINGS
Someone born on Leap Day may be called a 'leapling'. Leaplings usually celebrate their birthdays on February 28th or March 1st.

BLESSING OR CURSE?
In non-leap years certain countries legally recognize February 29th birthdays on February 28th or March 1st--resulting in hassles with birth certificates, driver's licenses and entry fields on websites. Many Leap Day babies report benefits to playing the 'leap day card', however--receiving discounts and free meals and admissions.

FAMOUS LEAPLINGS
--1980: Simon Gagne, Canadian hockey player and NHL All-Star
--1976: Ja Rule, American rapper and actor
--1972: Saul Williams, American rap poet and actor
--1972: Antonio Sabato Jr., Italian-born soap star whose credits include 'The Bold and the Beautiful', 'Melrose Place' and 'General Hospital'
--1968: Bryce Eric Paup, football player, named NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 1995 and a four-time Pro Bowl selection
--1952: Sharon Dahlonega Raiford Bush, America's first African-American weather anchor
--1944: Dennis Farina, ex-Chicago policeman-turned-actor with memorable roles in 'Get Shorty' and 'Law & Order'
--1940: Billy Turner, successful trainer of thoroughbreds including Seattle Slew (winner of the U.S. Triple Crown in 1977)
--1940: Gretchen Christopher, vocalist and songwriter who founded 'The Fleetwoods', one of the most popular doo-wop groups of the 1950s
--1936: Jack Lousma, astronaut who was a crew member of the Skylab 3 flight in 1973, and of the Columbia Space Shuttle in 1982
--1932: Newel Kay Brown, who wrote the children's song 'I Hope They Call Me On A Mission' (which every child in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints since 1970 has sung)
--1916: Dinah Shore, American singer, actress and television personality
--1904: Mr. Wolfe Plus 585 Sr., person with the longest official name. With a name for every letter of the alphabet, his full name is Adolph Blaine Charles David Earl Frederick Gerald Hubert Irvin John Kenneth Lloyd Martin Nero Oliver Paul Quincy Randolph Sherman Thomas Uncas Victor William Xerxes Yancy Zeus Wolfeschlegelsteinhausenberdorft Sr.
--1904: Jimmy Dorsey, prominent American jazz clarinetist, saxophonist, trumpeter and big band leader
--1736: Ann Lee, founder of the Shaker movement (which she brought to America in 1776)
--1712: General Montcalm, hero of the French & Indian War

LEAP YEAR MATH
A leap year is a year in the Gregorian calendar with one extra day added to the end of February, making the month 29 days long. The day was established to keep the seasons and the calendar in sync. A year is measured by the amount of time it takes the sun to return to the spot directly above the Earth's equator. Although it actually takes 365.2422 days, we round it to 365. This results in an error of 0.2422 days, or almost 6 hours, per year. After 100 years this calendar would be more than 24 days ahead of the seasons; Leap Day makes up for the inaccuracy. Years that end in '00' can only be a leap year if they are divisible by 400 (so 1900 was not a leap year, but 2000 was).

LEAP YEAR BY THE NUMBERS
--Between 1904 and 2096 Leap Day occurs on the same day of the week every 28 years (so the last time February had five Fridays was in 1980, and the next time will be in 2036).
--The odds of having a leap birthday are 1 in 1,461.
--The longest possible time between two leap years is 8 years. The last time this happened was between 1896 and 1904--and it won't happen again until 2096 to 2104.
--According to the 2000 U.S. Census there are about 200,000 Americans (and 4.1 million people worldwide) who were born on February 29th.
--Norway's Henriksen siblings are recognized by the 'Guinness Book of World Records'. The three siblings were born on three consecutive Leap Days (Heidi Henriksen in 1960; Olav Henriksen in 1964; and Leif-Martin Henriksen in 1968).

Sources: http://www.leapyearcapital.com/
; http://www.leapyearday.com/content/famous-leapers; and http://www.timeanddate.com/date/leapyear.html.

From TWU Libraries and TWUniversal Search--Happy Leap Day.

--Sandy Cochran

Wednesday's Fact of the Day

Q: What part did St. Bridget possibly play in the leap year tradition of the Ladies' Privilege?

A:
For the answer to today's question, visit the Oxford Reference Online Fact of the Day at http://www.oxfordreference.com/pub/views/fact-of-the-day.html?date=2012-02-29
.

Oxford Reference Online brings together language and subject dictionaries and a host of other reference works (including quotations, maps & illustrations, timelines and encyclopedias) into a single cross-searchable resource. Access it from the TWU Libraries homepage under Research/Databases A-Z List/O.

--Sandy Cochran

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Music To Your Ears: Database Trials in Music

TWU Libraries occasionally offer temporary access to research databases to gather feedback on possible acquisition. At these times input from TWU students and faculty becomes a vital part of the libraries' decision-making process.

Until April 16, 2012 there are trials taking place for the music databases listed below. Access to these and other current trials is available via the TWU Libraries Database Trials page (we'd appreciate your thoughts on the Database Trial Form at the bottom).

For questions about a database or other assistance, please contact a librarian via the TWU Libraries Ask a Librarian page.

We appreciate your time and assistance. Thank you.

African American Music Reference
offers the first and only electronic comprehensive coverage of blues, jazz, spirituals, civil rights songs, slave songs, minstrelsy, rhythm and blues, gospel and other forms of black American musical expression.

American Song
provides an aural history of America. Much more than a repository of well-known classics, this online collection includes music that relates to almost every walk of American life, every ethnic group and every time period. You’ll find songs by and about American Indians, miners, immigrants, slaves, children, pioneers and cowboys. There are songs of Civil Rights, political campaigns, Prohibition, the Revolutionary War, the Civil War and anti-war protests.

Classical Scores Library
contains over 400,000 pages of the most important classical music scores, manuscripts and previously unpublished material--allowing for the study and analysis of more than 25,000 musical scores.

The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music Online
is a comprehensive online resource devoted to music research of all the world’s peoples. More than 9,000 pages of material and 300 audio recordings, combined with entries by more than 700 expert contributors from all over the world, make this the most complete body of work focused on world music.

Jazz Music Library
is the largest and most comprehensive collection of jazz available online—with thousands of jazz artists, ensembles, albums and genres from the most important record labels. This resource is essential for any jazz history, performance, theory or music appreciation course.

Music Online
is the broadest and most comprehensive online music resource that cross-searches all of your library's Alexander Street Press music databases.

Opera in Video
offers more than 500 hours of streaming video, available electronically for the first time. Classic performances from the top opera companies and documentaries on specific operas, composers and companies cover the full range of operatic composition, from the Baroque to the twentieth century.

Smithsonian Global Sound
is a virtual encyclopedia of the world's musical and aural traditions. The collection provides educators, students and interested listeners with an unprecedented variety of online resources that support the creation, continuity and preservation of diverse musical forms. Included is an extraordinary array of more than 40,000 individual tracks of music, spoken word, and natural and human-made sounds.

--Sandy Cochran

Tuesday's Fact of the Day

Q: What did the researchers who carried out the Iowa gambling task prove?

A:
For the answer to today's question, visit the Oxford Reference Online Fact of the Day at http://www.oxfordreference.com/pub/views/fact-of-the-day.html?date=2012-02-28
.

Oxford Reference Online brings together language and subject dictionaries and a host of other reference works (including quotations, maps & illustrations, timelines and encyclopedias) into a single cross-searchable resource. Access it from the TWU Libraries homepage under Research/Databases A-Z List/O.

--Sandy Cochran

Monday, February 27, 2012

January Arrivals: TWU Libraries Collections Continue to Grow

The collections of TWU Libraries are constantly growing as new resources--electronic, media and print--are continually requested and added to existing selections.

During January 2
012 TWU Libraries increased the variety of current, relevant resources available to TWU students and faculty and other library patrons by adding an impressive 476 titles to its catalog. Titles range from those in academic subject areas to entertaining novels housed in the Blagg-Huey Library's Browsing Collection.

If you're eager to read a recent bestseller--but don't feel the need to buy your own copy--scan the new titles list to see if the book has recently been added to our collections. Is a research paper's daunting deadline looming in your future? Look through the list for recently-released relevant titles. Clicking on any title will take you to its TWU Libraries catalog record--providing you with all of the information you need to select and locate what you're seeking (a title with the designation "in process" means the item has been received by the libraries and will be cataloged and made publicly available soon).

Looking for a specific title not in the catalog? Submit a request to purchase library materials on the Request Book/Media Purchase Form,
or request titles from other libraries on the TWU Libraries Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery Services page.


Happy reading!


--Aubrey James

Monday's Fact of the Day

Q: From which port did the 17th-century Sallee pirates operate?

A: For the answer to today's question, visit the Oxford Reference Online Fact of the Day at http://www.oxfordreference.com/pub/views/fact-of-the-day.html?date=2012-02-27
.

Oxford Reference Online brings together language and subject dictionaries and a host of other reference works (including quotations, maps & illustrations, timelines and encyclopedias) into a single cross-searchable resource. Access it from the
TWU Libraries homepage under Research/Databases A-Z List/O.

--Sandy Cochran

Friday, February 24, 2012

What a Difference A Century Makes

Illustrated historical trivia paints a picture of American life 100 years ago in 1912: One Hundred Years Ago in History. Curated by staff of the Blagg-Huey Library Woman's Collection.

For history and trivia buffs alike, the Woman's Collection of the Blagg-Huey Library on the Denton campus of TWU is proud to present 1912: One Hundred Years Ago in History.

Featured in the library's first-floor lobby, 1912 includes photos and trivia which together paint a picture of American life one century ago.


Highlights include:
--The Repub
lic of China is formed;
--New Mexic
o is admitted to the United States as the 47th state;
--Albert Berry makes the first parachute jump from a moving plane;
--Alfred Wegener proposes the Theory of Continental Drift;

--More than ten thousand suffragettes and their supporters parade in New York City;
--The Girls Scouts of the USA is founded;
--Joe Dawson wins the In
dianapolis 500 in the race's second year;
--Universal Pictures is incorporated; and
--Woodrow Wilson (above left) wins the Presidential election and Teddy Roosevelt places second. William Howard Taft finishes third and in 1921 becomes the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

These tidbits and more, charmingly illustrated, are available for viewing for a limited time during the library's regular hours.

--Sandy Cochran

Celebrating Black History Month

As Black History Month--the annual celebration of the contributions of African Americans throughout U.S. history--draws to a close, may we suggest:

--The African American History Month website hosted by the Library of Congress;

--The Black History Month page of the History Channel website;

--Selected videos and selected sources from the collections of the TWU Libraries, compiled by Reference Librarian Jimmie Lyn Harris;

--TWU Library Blog posts
He Had a Dream: Honoring the Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Database Trial: Black Studies Center; Out of Africa and Into the Library; The Final Week of Black History Month; and By and About Dr. Maya Angelou;

--TWUniversal Search (accessible from the TWU Libraries homepage from the maroon bar on the left). A search for "Black History Month" in TWUniversal Search yields a treasure trove of material: journal articles, books, newspaper articles, audio-visual resources, websites and more; and

--Finally, from the 'How Cool Is That' Department, see President Obama belt out a few bars of 'Sweet Home Chicago' with the legendary B.B. King. Also performing at the Black History Month celebration at the White House this week: Mick Jagger, Jeff Beck, Buddy Guy, Keb Mo, Warren Haynes, Derek Trucks and actress Taraji P. Henson. Catch "In Performance at the White House: Red, White and Blues" on PBS Monday, February 27th.


Illustration source: whwweb.com

--Sandy Cochran

Thursday, February 23, 2012

Spring Library Workshops in Full Bloom

A new semester is in full swing, and once again the TWU Libraries are offering library training workshops to provide hands-on instruction to all interested TWU students, faculty and staff. Seating is limited, so make your reservations today.

These workshops are designed to provide information about library resources and search skills so that research may be conducted in a more effective and scholarly manner. The workshops are generally small in size, which allows them to be geared toward participants' individual research needs and disciplines.

DENTON CAMPUS WORKSHOPS
To attend a workshop at the Blagg-Huey Library on the Denton campus you must register at least 24 hours in advance by contacting Librarian Jimmie Lyn Harris at JHarris@twu.edu or 940-898-3740. Each workshop is limited to 12 participants and is held in the Reference Training Room on the 1st floor of the Blagg-Huey Library. For assistance stop by the Information Desk on your right as you enter the building. Jimmie Lyn also welcomes individual appointments.

Denton campus workshops currently scheduled:


Finding Articles
These workshops demonstrate how to use TWU Libraries resources to find information pertinent to a discipline or major. We'll discuss subject guides, full-text resources, basic and advanced search options, and search strategies.

Friday, March 2nd (10 a.m. to 11 a.m.)

RefWorks
Need help citing your papers? Do APA, MLA, Chicago and Turabian style manuals seem like mazes? Discover the wonders of RefWorks. RefWorks is a web-based citation management and formatting program available to all current TWU students, faculty and staff from any computer with web access. RefWorks can import citations from library databases and other bibliography programs such as Endnote and Reference Manager.

Thursday, March 8th (Noon to 1 p.m.)

T. BOONE PICKENS INSTITUTE OF HEALTH SCIENCES--DALLAS CENTER LIBRARY WORKSHOPS
Workshops available by appointment. For more information, contact Librarian Eula Oliphant at EOliphant@twu.edu or 214-689-6580.

--Jimmie Lyn Harris

Breaking A Leg in Different Cultures: Database Trials in Drama

TWU Libraries occasionally offer temporary access to research databases to gather feedback on possible acquisition. At these times, input from TWU students and faculty becomes a vital part of the libraries' decision-making process.

Until April 16, 2012 there are trials taking place for the drama databases listed below. Access to these and other current trials is available via the TWU Libraries Database Trials page (we'd appreciate your thoughts on the Database Trial Form at the bottom).

For questions about a database or other assistance, please contact a librarian via the TWU Libraries Ask a Librarian page.

We appreciate your time and assistance. Thank you.

Alexander Street Drama
brings together thousands of plays from Alexander Street’s six full-text drama collections and makes them accessible and cross-searchable in a single resource.

American Film Scripts makes available, for the first time, accurate and authorized versions of copyrighted screenplays. Most of the scripts are published here for the first time--and nowhere else are they available online.

Asian American Drama contains 252 plays by 42 playwrights--together with detailed, fielded information on related productions, theaters, production companies and more. Roughly half of these plays are previously unpublished. Also included: select playbills, production photographs and other ephemera related to the plays.


Black Drama contains 1,462 plays by 233 playwrights--together with detailed, fielded information on related productions, theaters, production companies and more. Also included: select playbills, production photographs and other ephemera related to the plays. About 600 of the plays are published here for the first time--including a number by major authors.

North American Indian Drama features full-text plays representing the stories and creative energies of American Indian and First Nation playwrights of the twentieth century. Many of the plays included here are previously unpublished or hard to find.

North American Women's Drama
contains 1,517 plays by 330 playwrights--together with detailed, fielded information on related productions, theaters, production companies and more. More than 30% of the plays in this collection have never before been published. Also included: select playbills, production photographs and other ephemera related to the plays.


Twentieth Century North American Drama
contains 1,530 plays by 223 playwrights--together with detailed, fielded information on related productions, theaters, production companies and more. Also included: select playbills, production photographs and other ephemera related to the plays. More than 150 of the plays are published here for the first time--including a number by major authors.


--Sandy Cochran

Thursday's Fact of the Day

Q: For which newspaper does Clark Kent work?

A:
For the answer to today's question, visit the Oxford Reference Online Fact of the Day at http://www.oxfordreference.com/pub/views/fact-of-the-day.html?date=2012-02-23
.

Oxford Reference Online brings together language and subject dictionaries and a host of other reference works (including quotations, maps & illustrations, timelines and encyclopedias) into a single cross-searchable resource. Access it from the TWU Libraries homepage under Research/Databases A-Z List/O.

--Sandy Cochran

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Wednesday's Fact of the Day

Q: In British history who was Sweyn Forkbeard?

A: For the answer to today's question, visit the Oxford Reference Online Fact of the Day at http://www.oxfordreference.com/pub/views/fact-of-the-day.html?date=2012-02-22.

Oxford Reference Online brings together language and subject dictionaries and a host of other reference works (including quotations, maps & illustrations, timelines and encyclopedias) into a single cross-searchable resource. Access it from the TWU Libraries homepage under Research/Databases A-Z List/O.

--Sandy Cochran

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

WASP Collection to Soar with Anonymous Donation

WASP (L-R) Frances Green, Margaret Kirchner, Ann Currier and Blanche Bross in their flight gear--with the B-17 "Pistol Packin' Mama" in the background--after training at Lockbourne AAB, Columbus, Ohio. From the Women Airforce Service Pilots Digital Collection of Texas Woman's University.

Texas Woman's University Libraries recently announced it has received a $100,000 gift from an anonymous donor to continue the digitization and preservation of its WASP (Women Airforce Service Pilots) Collection.

During World War II the WASP became the first women to fly military aircraft for the United States armed forces. In 1992, the Women Airforce Service Pilots of World War II honored the Woman’s Collection of Texas Woman's University by designating it as its official national archive.

In addition to containing over 1 million historical documents, the WASP collection includes over 35,000 photographs, approximately 700 oral histories and over 700 personal collections--as well as uniforms, artifacts, memorabilia, letters and diaries.

Class 43-W-4 members (Nancye Ruth Lowe Crout, Eileen Marjorie Roach Kesti, Mary Edith Engle, Isabel Madison Van Lom (Center), Virginia Malany Meloney, Virginia Hill Wood and Ruth Florey Underwood) with their instructor. Avenger Field, Sweetwater, Texas, 1943. From the Women Airforce Service Pilots Digital Collection of Texas Woman's University.

This recent gift is from a generous
benefactor who donated $100,000 once before--in 2009--to support the WASP collection.

This gift will assist in the preservation and digitization of the WASP collection, enabling access to a worldwide audience--as well as ensuring that degradation of historical documents is minimized through reduced handling. Digitization initiatives will also enable TWU Libraries to include the achievements of these women after--as well as during--the war.

The gift will also help to support
continued public outreach and programming. The Woman’s Collection supports nearly 100 exhibits annually, many of them focused on women’s military and aviation history.

With this anonymous act of generosity TWU Libraries will continue to honor and promote the legacy and history of the WASP--the first women to fly for our country.

--Kimberly Johnson