Monday, February 9, 2015

Fire in the Sky at Professor's Corner

Fire in the Sky  Walt Whitman's Year of Meteors, 1859, '60, thought to be inspired by an actual rare meteor
event
, is one of the works of "comet literature" to be discussed during Fire in the Sky: The Frightful Appearance
of Comets in Literature.  Part of the Professor's Corner series, a free discussion group devoted to quality
presentations on literary topics, 
Fire is scheduled for Wednesday, February 11, 2015 at the South Branch of the
Denton Public Library.  Image courtesy of Smithsonian.com.
The next session of Professor's Corner, a free discussion group devoted to quality presentations on literary topics, is coming soon.  Join us on Wednesday, February 11, 2015 for Fire in the Sky: The Frightful Appearance of Comets in Literature. Refreshments will be served. Admission is free and open to all.  

ABOUT THIS SESSION
The last few years of the twentieth century saw the release of a number of theatrical and TV movies about the threat of comets crashing into the earth.  Films such as Deep Impact, Armageddon, Doomsday Rock and Meteorites may have tapped into ancient human fears about the appearance of comets, especially ones that appeared near momentous calendar events.  While humans have not always been able to present the spectacle of comets in big-screen, computer-generated splendor, for many centuries in many places people around the world have produced “comet literature,” literature that expresses the various emotions comets have long inspired: wonder, anxiety and curiosity. During this session we will recapture some of those feelings as we read samples of comet literature--including Walt Whitman’s poem Year of Meteors (1859-60); Goethe’s poem Threatening Signs; William Blake’s poem Gwin, King of Norway; and excerpts of sermons by Increase Mather.   

WHEN & WHERE

Wednesday, February 11, 2015
7:00 to 8:30 p.m.
Denton Public Library, South Branch (3228 Teasley, Denton, Texas, 76210.  Just south of the Teasley/Lillian Miller intersection. A Google map and directions are available here.)

COST
This program is free and open to the public.  Refreshments will be served.

SPEAKER
This session's presenter is Dr. Brian Fehler.  Dr. Fehler recently joined the faculty of Texas Woman’s University as an associate professor and holds a PhD in English from Texas Christian University.  He studies and teaches the history of rhetoric, particularly nineteenth-century American oratory and later adaptations of classical rhetoric in British and American public discourse.


OPTIONAL READINGS FOR THIS SESSION
Walt Whitman's Year of Meteors, 1859, ‘60; Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's Threatening SignsThe Conversation of Eiros and Charmion by Edgar Allan Poe; Mark Twain's Captain Stormfield’s Visit to Heaven; and Mystery of Meteors by Eleanor Lerman are recommended but not required.
            
THE PROFESSOR'S CORNER SERIES
The purpose of this free series is to meet a public need for high-quality presentations on literary topics by featuring local English professors who talk about their special interests.  The presentations are aimed at the general public and allow for discussion. Readings of modest length are usually available in advance.  Gatherings are usually on the second Wednesday of specified months from 7:00 p.m. to about 8:30 p.m.  Monthly announcements are available by e-mail; to get on the mailing list send a request to Fred Kamman of the Denton Public Library at Fred.Kamman@cityofdenton.com.

STILL TO COME: PROFESSOR'S CORNER 2014-15
March 11, 2015:  Shakespeare's King Lear in Adaptation (Dr. Ashley Bender, Speaker)
April 8, 2015:  The Legends of King Arthur (Dr. Matthew Brown, Speaker)
May 13, 2015:  It's Epic! Derek Walcott’s Omeros (Dr. Carl Smeller, Speaker)

SERIES COORDINATOR

Fred Kamman of the Denton Public Library.  Reach him at Fred.Kamman@cityofdenton.com or 940-349-8752. 
SERIES PRODUCER
Dr. Stephen Souris of Texas Woman’s University.  Reach him at SSouris@twu.edu or 940-898-2343.

THANK YOU TO THESE SUPPORTERS OF THE PROFESSOR'S CORNER SERIES
Many thanks to Denton Public LibraryVoertman'sRecycled Books Records CDs, and Cooper’s Copies and Printing for their support.  This program was also made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

We hope to see you there.


~Dr. Stephen Souris

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